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LIVING WITH MONKEYS/BABOONS

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This site was created with one objective: to provide a platform for those seeking primate related information. Although it is a blog site, and comments are read and sometimes added, it is not our intention to have an interactive blog. Residents wanting to liase on how to co-exist with monkeys or baboons, please contact us via email. Given the stats data we receive, many people from all over the world visit our site daily, particularly the slide show on how to co-exist with wild primates. We welcome you all and thank you for popping by.

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PREVENTING CONFLICTS

Don’t feed monkeys by hand or off verandas and window sills. This encourages them to approach you and your house and can escalate raiding and conflict. It is as difficult for a monkey to resist a ripe bunch of bananas on display on your table as it is for a child to resist candy in a candy store.

Don’t shoot monkeys with pellet guns, firearms or catapults or throw crackers at them. All of these activities are illegal and will lead to prosecution. In addition, they also serve to maim the animal leading to untold pain and suffering.

Don’t attempt to catch a baby monkey for a pet or ask someone to obtain one for you or accept one if offered to you. The troop is extremely protective of their young and capturing a baby invariable involves killing the baby’s mother and other monkeys aiding in their protection. Remember, baby monkeys may be cute and cuddly when small - but become difficult to handle as adults.

Don’t allow children to tease, shout or panic when around monkeys. Monkeys regard loud noises and sudden movement as aggression and are likely to retaliate in defence.

Don’t teach your dogs to chase and attack monkeys. If cornered by a dog the troop could retaliate and seriously injure your pet.

When smiling at their antics do not show your teeth or make direct eye contact for long periods of time. Facial expressions are particularly important in the communication of all primates and humans unknowingly communicate threats which may invoke aggressive response.

Remember that monkeys are not naturally aggressive towards us unless they have been provoked.